Frozen Moment

In the “Frozen Moment” module, I had to look at how to choose the most effective moment in a story and how to present it in a way that effectively captivates the reader, through choice of colour and composition.

To do this I re-read through my story that I used for the previous module “Stolen Jacket”, which was a story entitled “King of the Peacocks” which I have described in my previous blog post.

I went through different moments in the story and did quick sketches of each moment to see which one is the most interesting image to look at.

I decided to choose the moment that the Prince encounters the King of the Peacocks for the first time as it is an intense moment which also had a lot of room for interpretation as an illustrator as to how the prince felt when he met the King, what emotion he was feeling, if he was tired from travelling, and what the King and Prince looked like. When reading through the story I imagined the King to be quite a threatening figure so decided to take this through to my illustrations.

To begin experimenting I decided to illustrate the scene of the Prince meeting the King from multiple perspectives to get an idea of what would be the most effective angle to use to make the image as captivating as possible.

 

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I found that the most interesting view point was that of the King, as it allows you to finally see what the Prince looks like, yet it keeps the mystery of what the King looks like.

I also like how it gives the reader more sense of importance as it puts the reader in the spot of an actual character, and gives a bigger sense of involvement within the story.

I then decided to experiment with the progress of time in a story, so took the moment that the Prince approaches the doors to the King’s castle as the main moment, and illustrated what I think would have happened 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after.

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Doing this also gave me a better understanding of the story and what the Prince had been through to get to the point of meeting the King, and how daunting it would be to finally find what he had been searching for during his long journey.

During this project I took part in a colour workshop, so learnt the new skill of making my own limited colour palette,  These were the outcomes of painting still objects in front of me using gouache:

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I found this experiment fun, and went on to use a limited palette on an Edward Hopper piece with markers which also had a successful result. There was a good amount of depth in colour in the piece and was also eye catching with the choice of colours, as well as contrast and look of the markers which I used on the paper as it gave a smooth texture, which was quite a contrast to what my paintings of the objects in front of me looked like.

As I chose to do the piece in the perspective as the King, I was curious as to what would happen if I were to switch the view points from the perspective of the King to the view point of the Prince, and this was the outcome:

King peacock

I found that this perspective would still be quite interesting, yet would give away what the King looks like so removes an aspect of mystery behind the story. Also, the King’s pose allows me to make the illustration appear more realistic (seems more as if the reader is playing the character of the King).

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This was the final outcome of the moment the Prince first encounters the King of the Peacocks.

I decided to use the skills I used in the colour workshop in my final piece to see the effect that the colours have on the piece.

I am pleased with the outcome of the piece as it is different to the pieces I usually create and shows my skills in illustration improving.

 

 

 

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